2017 Tax Season begins for those who didn’t file Earned Income or Additional Child Tax Credit

Share and Spread the news

2017 Tax Season begins for those who didn’t file Earned Income or Additional Child Tax Credit

2017 Tax Season began yesterday, but not for those who filed EITC or ACTC

Yesterday the IRS began accepting 2016 federal tax refunds, they will process around 153 million tax returns this season. As a reminder, you have until April 18th, 2017 to file your 2016 tax return. If you file an extension, you will have until October 18th, 2017 to file your 2016 tax return. 2017 Tax Season off to a slow start.

“Following months of hard work, we successfully opened our processing systems today to start this year’s tax season,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen.  “Getting to this point is a year-round effort for the IRS and the nation’s tax community. The dedicated employees of the IRS look forward to serving taxpayers this filing season, and I want to thank all of the tax and payroll community for their hard work that makes tax time smoother for the nation.”

The IRS expects more than 70 percent of taxpayers to get tax refunds this year. Last year, 111 million refunds were issued, with an average refund of $2,860.

2017 Tax Season begins for those who didn't file Earned Income or Additional Child Tax Credit

Tax Refund Delays
A law change now requires the IRS to hold refunds on tax returns claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) until Feb. 15. Under this change required by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act, the IRS must hold the entire refund — even the portion not associated with the EITC and ACTC. Even though the IRS will begin releasing EITC and ACTC refunds on Feb. 15, many early filers will still not have actual access to their refunds until the week of Feb. 27. The additional delay is due to several factors, including weekends, the Presidents Day holiday and the time banks often need to process direct deposits.

This law change gives the IRS more time to detect and prevent fraud. Beyond the EITC and ACTC refunds and  the additional security safeguards, the IRS anticipates issuing more than nine out of 10 refunds in less than 21 days. However, it’s possible a particular return may require additional review and take longer. Taxpayers are reminded that state tax agencies have their own refund processing timeframes that vary, and some states may make additional reviews to ensure their refunds are being issued properly. Even so, taxpayers should file as usual, and tax return preparers should submit returns as they normally do.

Check your tax refund with the IRS Where’s My Refund tool.

2018 Refund Schedule and Refund Calculator now available!Click here